Bring Me the Sports Jacket of Arthur Montford: An Adventure Through Scottish Football

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Bring Me the Sports Jacket of Arthur Montford: An Adventure Through Scottish Football

Bring Me the Sports Jacket of Arthur Montford: An Adventure Through Scottish Football

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But inspired as we all are by all these memories of Arthur, we fall far short of telling the whole story of the life of this most remarkable man.

Montford's first audition in Maryhill Burgh Hall was dismal, but he was given another chance at the Theatre Royal and more than passed muster. After stepping down as a director, Montford continued his affiliation with the club as an Honorary Vice-president. Montford spent 32 years as the presenter of Scottish Television’s Scotsport programme where he was best known for his football coverage, although he was also covered a range of other sports, especially golf.BIG names from TV and sport got into a right stramash this afternoon - to remember the life of Arthur Montford. And he said that during golf outings, when things were tight, Arthur would often start commentating to build the tension. You lived for these TV highlights, and the sometimes high-octane commentaries of Arthur or Archie Macpherson.

Arthur Montford died at his home on 26 November 2014 at the age 85, after battling illness intermittently over a couple of years. His recollections of some of golf's greatest players, moments, and tournaments were popular with the magazine's readers and he was the title's longest-serving regular contributor.And as I was leaving, Archie McCulloch who was one of the 'heid yins' in the Theatre Royal at the time along with Rai Purdy and Jim Coulthard and others, he said to me "would you like to work full time here" I said well, I said, "I'm making thirteen pounds and ten shillings at the Evening Times, what's the money? Montford began as a journalist and radio presenter before the opening of the STV studios at the Theatre Royal offered another opportunity.

Thanks to his friend, Douglas Rae, at whose house Montford’s second marriage took place with Rae as best man, Montford was appointed director of Morton FC, and latterly became honorary vice-president. Everybody knew him through his broadcast journalism but he did not have a different personality away from the TV. Despite being committed to Scotsport, Montford continued to continuity announce with STV by covering irregular shifts as a relief continuity announcer (often out-of-vision, sometimes in-vision) on occasions of holidays, illness or other staff absences - where he would often read the lunchtime and evening Scottish news bulletins, announce the daytime and evening programmes as billed and close the station at around midnight with, of course, the friendly and reassuring closedown sequence when “we hoped you enjoyed our programmes today and you will join us again in the morning at 9.Montford’s audition in Maryhill Burgh Hall was dismal, but he was given another chance at the Theatre Royal and more than passed muster. These went well, and when BBC sports editor John Wilson joined Scottish Television in 1957, he asked Montford to join him in the new commercial visual age. My father told me that no matter how poor the game was, whether you were writing it, describing it on radio, or commentating on it, you must look for something worthwhile to talk about and do not be negative.

Throughout a long and hectic career, He interviewed all the greats from Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player to name amongst a few famous sport players whom Montford had the pleasure of meeting over time. Yet it is precisely Montford’s verbal style that he is loved for and his erudite expressions could enliven the most trying of sporting events.I just went up, did my ad-lib, did my wee bit to camera, did an interview and I thought no more about it. In May 2010, Montford received the SPFA Special Merit award for his services to football broadcasting and journalism alongside fellow broadcaster Archie Macpherson. Though again he did not shout about it, his politics in the 70s favoured the SNP, and he helped the late Margo McDonald in her campaign in Govan in 1973. A diligent rector, he was reckoned by students to be on their side, and at the height of his fame he helped all forms of charity no matter their background, lending his name to good causes such as the Simon Community and Talbot Association. A couple of weeks later I thought no more about it, but he invited me back to the Theatre Royal: really to make the numbers up for someone whom they had in mind, but at the last minute he decided he didn't want the job.



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